Quorn Food Unsafe For Consumption By Doctor

Social media users in South Africa expressed discontent over the Quorn Food’s product when learning that some of their products contain egg.

quorn foods

However, it’s important to know that Quorn foods can contain allergens, such as egg, milk and gluten. These are clearly marked on the back of pack within the allergy advice section.

If you want to stay healthy, the simple rule is to avoid processed foods and this is certainly true for meat substitutes. There are a number of meat substitutes on the market, but some appear to be more unsavory than others, in terms of safety.

The Quorn brand meat substitute falls into this category. Quorn is a fungus-based ferment. Its advertised claims include being 75 percent lower in fat and 50 percent lower in calories compared to regular meat. It’s also high in fiber and protein, and low in cholesterol and salt.

That may sound all well and good, but there are lingering questions about its ability to cause severe reactions in some people. In an August 18 press release,1 the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) writes:

“Of the several shortcomings of the Food and Drug Administration’s oversight of food additives exposed in today’s Washington Post,2 none is more glaring than the agency’s lack of curiosity in the safety of Quorn-brand meat substitutes…

The fungus at issue, Fusarium venenatum, had never before been used in human food before it became Quorn. (‘Venenatum,’ inauspiciously, is Latin for poisonous.)”

Adverse Effects Reported

Launched in 1985, Quorn is now sold in over 16 countries around the world.

It was originally developed by one of the largest chemical companies in Great Britain called Imperial Chemical Industries, and this in and of itself could serve as a clue as to its health potential…

The fungus, Fusarium venenatum, is first grown in large fermentation vats, where it is fed with oxygen, glucose, and other nutrients. Once the water is removed, what is left is a paste-like biomass, which is then processed into various food products.

Since its inception, several studies have raised concerns about Quorn’s safety—especially in people with food and/or mold allergies. A CSPI survey also found that mycoprotein is more likely to cause adverse reactions than other common allergenic foods such as shellfish, milk, and peanuts.

So far, CSPI has collected more than 2,000 reports of adverse reactions to Quorn.3, 4 Adverse effects include:

  • Nausea
  • Cramps
  • Diarrhea
  • Forceful vomiting
  • Anaphylactic reactions

Two deaths5 are even suspected to have resulted from eating the Quorn brand meat substitute. In a previous post,6 CSPI also noted that an early study done by the manufacturer found that 10 percent of 200 human subjects developed nausea or a stomachache after eating Quorn.

Consumers will find a wealth of answers by visiting this link

Source Inputs: Dr Mercola click here

 


About Indianspice Staff Reporter

Report and write stories for Indianspice.co.za. It is our ambitious goal to cover issues/events/news concerning South Africa and the diaspora.

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