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Hate eating karela, spinach and other greens? Your genes may be the reason,says study

Getting an earful from mum everyday for not eating ‘green vegetables’ is a routine. Because most of us don’t like eating vegetables and we keep thinking of excuses to escape the wrath of moms over veggies, of course.

And through a recent study, science has given us that much-needed escape! According to the study reported by BBC, your hatred for certain vegetables has nothing to do with your taste-buds, but can be traced back to your genes.

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As per the experts from the University of Kentucky School of Medicine, every person inherits two copies of a taste gene called TAS2R38 which encodes a protein that allows us to taste bitterness. Those who inherit two copies of a variant of this gene called AVI are not sensitive to bitter tastes while those who inherit one copy of AVI and another called PAV perceive bitter tastes.

“The person who has that genetic propensity gets more of the sulfur flavor of, say, Brussels sprouts, especially if they’ve been overcooked,” University of Connecticut professor Valerie Duffy told CNN.

“So that [bitter] vegetable is disliked, and because people generalize, soon all vegetables are disliked,” Duffy said. “If you ask people, ‘Do you like vegetables?’ They don’t usually say, ‘Oh yeah, I don’t like this, but I like these others.’ People tend to either like vegetables or not,” she added.

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175 people participated in the survey and it was found that those who inherited a copy of AVI and PAV each ate only small amounts of leafy green vegetables. On the other hand, people with only AVI genes were found to show liking towards green veggies.

So, the next time your mother scolds you for not eating green vegetables, you could always blame it on genes or on your forefathers! * wink *


About Indianspice Staff Reporter

Report and write stories for Indianspice.co.za. It is our ambitious goal to cover issues/events/news concerning South Africa and the diaspora.

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