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Colorism: Her Only Fault Was Being Dark Skinned

PHOTOGRAPHY: Arjun Kamath is a photographer and film student in Los Angeles created a fictional photo story titled “Color Of Our Skin” which is a beautiful tale advocating against colorism and the stigm associated with dark skin. This series of photos tell a story about a dark-skinned woman whose family is struggling to get her married, and her journey towards accepting that she is beautiful as she is.

“The story idea is simple: to stop judging people for the way they look – dark, fair, slim, overweight etc. Life’s a short journey, so let’s make it memorable and worthwhile for ourselves and everyone else around us. Live and let live.”

Arjun Kamath

Each picture evokes such emotions, have a dekko here

On most days, Dhananjay and Ranika waited at the top of the hillock for the sun to set before taking the long walk back home;

You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.

Ranika had just finished college at the nearby town and returned home after four long years, although while she was away she would return home on weekends to see her parents and eat her mother’s delicious homemade food. Ranika was an only child and her parents always meant the world to her.

You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.

No music could be finer for Dhananjay than Ranika’s infectious laughter. It rang out now among the symphony of colors, smells and sounds. This could never be replicated in a photograph and so he would only move from this spot once all the daylight was robbed from this scene, stealing away the light and color to shroud them with the darkness of the night.

You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.
You can read Kamath’s narration for each photo here.

In other news, the Indian beauty brand, Hindustan Unilever, has revealed that it will drop the word ‘fair’ from their Fair & Lovely product range in wake of the protests against skin lightening products and celebrities who endorse the range.

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NEWS: Beauty brand Hindustan Unilever has revealed that it will drop the word ‘Fair’ from their Fair & Lovely product range in wake of the protests against skin lightening products and celebrities who endorse the range. . The company will also remove any reference that pertains to "lightening and "whitening" on products that are sold across Asia territory. Unilever acknowledged the branding suggests "a singular ideal of beauty". . "This product has built upon, perpetuated and benefited from internalised racism and promotes anti-blackness sentiments." . The beauty product company took notice of two petitions that called on Unilever to end the production of the Fair & Lovely range. The petition has garnered more than 18,000 signatures in recent weeks. The second petition claims the Unilever product range "tells us that there is something wrong with our color, that we have to be light in order to feel beautiful. In order to feel worthy." . CHECK OUT THE STORY ON OUR WEBSITE . 😎 Hey! Are you interested in #advertising your products on our Instagram @spiceofi? Go check us out! DM us for more information! . #FlattenTheCurve #StayHome #StaySafe #LockdownSA #StayHomeSA #PrayForSouthAfrica . To be featured on #indianSpice tag us #spiceofi 😎 . Are you following us on #Instagram & #Twitter? Find us as @spiceofi for #news that matters to the #SouthAfricanIndian community and the #IndianDiaspora visit us for more at www.indianspice.co.za

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The company will also remove any reference that pertains to “lightening and “whitening” on products that are sold across Asia territory. Unilever acknowledged the branding suggests “a singular ideal of beauty”. Check out that story here

Source: Arjun Kamath Facebook

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